Active Listening Worksheet 2 – Nature Video

Here is a worksheet for the remaining part of the Nature video.  I’ve divided the recording into three parts to help you work on short extracts each time.  Again, click on the link and fill in the blanks as you listen.  At the bottom there are more ideas for how to use the video for practise with both listening and speaking as well as some notes on the language.

 Video: Nature – Handing on a Sustainable future

Exercise 1 

Each generation had five members and a hundred units to share. If _________ _________ ___________ __________ __________, the resource made it through ________ __________ ___________ _________________ and was ____________ _________ ________ _____________.

The team ____________ ________ _____________ __________ _________________ things.

If people were allowed __________ ____________ ____________ ___________ _______________ about how _______________ _____________ _____________ _____________ the pool, the resource __________’______ ______________ ____________ _____________ _______________ generation. __________________, ___________ ______________ ___________ ______________ _______ ____________ big takers who _____________ _________________.

Then the researchers ____________ _________ __________________ ________________ ____________ the game. This time the five ________________ ____________ ____________ how much _________ ____________. And each member ____________ __________ _______________ _______________ ____________ ____________________. Voting like this ______________ ______________ selfish interests and _________ ________________ _________ future generations __________ _________ ________________ _____________ _____________ ______________. (By the way, no players ______________ _______________.) The resource ___________ ________________. In some games ____________ ____________ _____________ _________ ________________ __________________. But _________ ____________ _______________ ____________ ________________________ _________________.

Exercise 2

In another _________________ _______ ________ game, _________ _____ _______ _____________ voted _______ _______ _____________ ____________ freely. The pool was depleted. Voting _____________ , the authors say, because ______ _______________ _______ cooperative types _________ restrain the *grabbers. __________ ___________ ____________ ___________ cooperators are reassured ___________ __________ ___________ ________ _________ _________ vain. Nobody wants to be a **sucker.

So, _______ ________ ______________________ ________ _________________ ______ our warm and cooperative feelings ____________ _____________ ________________? Well, our cooperative nature ________ ___________ _________ harnessed _____ ________ ___________ _____ binding, which is why non-binding agreements, like the Kyoto protocol on carbon emissions, _________ _____________ ______________.

International politics _______ ____________ _____________ ______ ________ ______________. So next, ________ _____________ _____________ _______ ________________ _______ residents of different countries play the game, _______ _________ ________ _______________ ________________ cooperation.

Exercise 3

The final part of the video recording (from 3:06 to the end) is quite short but may be the most difficult because the pace seems faster and the pauses between words and phrases are fewer and shorter. It’s this chunking together of words and phrases (which makes your spoken language more natural) that makes decoding language when listening more difficult. Listen and fill in the blanks as before:

In the meantime, _______ __________ ___________ __________ __________ _______ ______ ___________ ____________ level. For instance, ________ ____________ __________________ ________ _______ _______________ ______________ votes on a maximum catch ___________ ____________ _____________ ______________ _______ held to _______________ , the community ***has a better shot ______ ______________ __________ ___________ __________ _________ _________________.

The study ____________ ______________ _________ _______ capacity that ____________ ______________ ______________ humans _______ _______________ _______ . It was Albert Einstein who said ‘________________ __________ _______________ _________ ________ __________________ except ______ ______ _________________ _____________________ _________ _____________ individuals.’

 

Answers:

Exercise 1

Each generation had five members and a hundred units to share. If more than half were left, the resource made it through to the next generation and was renewed to a hundred.

The team tried a couple of different things.

If people were allowed to make their own decisions about how much to take from the pool, the resource didn’t last to the next generation. Usually, it was just one or two big takers who were responsible.

Then the researchers tried a different version of the game. This time the five members voted on how much to take. And each member got to take home the average. Voting like this goes against selfish interests and in favour of future generations who the voters will never meet. (By the way, no players were related.) The resource was sustainable. In some games the resource lasted for fourteen generations. But it only works if everyone votes.

Exercise 2

In another variation of the game, only a few people voted and the others chose freely. The pool was depleted. Voting works, the authors say, because the majority of cooperative types can restrain *the grabbers. And also because the cooperators are reassured that their efforts are not in vain. Nobody wants to be a **sucker.

So how can governments take advantage of our warm and cooperative feelings towards future generations? Well, our cooperative nature can only be harnessed if the vote is binding, which is why non-binding agreements, like the Kyoto protocol on carbon emissions, have little power.
International politics is never going to be easy. So next, the team plan to explore how residents of different countries play the game, to see if culture influences cooperation.

In the meantime, the idea might work best on a more local level. For instance, if every fisherman in a given area votes on a maximum catch per day and everyone is held to account, the community has ***a better shot at preserving fish stocks for the future.
The study provides evidence for a capacity that many have hoped humans are capable of. It was Albert Einstein who said ‘Nothing truly valuable can be achieved except by the unselfish cooperation of many individuals.’

Language Notes:

* the ‘grabbers’ is a word the speaker has used to refer to the people grabbing resources in a greedy way. This is a special usage of the word and is being used in a special way, so don’t try to learn and copy this.  

**the word ‘sucker’ is slang for a person who is gullible and easy to fool.  Because it is slang, you shouldn’t use words like this in the IELTS test, which is a formal situation that needs formal language.

*** ‘we have a better shot at …’ is an idiomatic phrase meaning  ‘our chances of succeeding will be greater’

Native speakers connect or run words together as they speak.  This is called ‘chunking’ and it can make this type of listening exercise more difficult.  You also need to practise chunking for your speaking test, otherwise your pronunciation can sound robotic.  To practise this, listen again to this part of the recording and mark all of the words that the speaker joins or chunk together. Then practise saying the sentences yourself in the same way.

Hello! All feedback and any IELTS questions are welcome.